A Strong Start For Star Wars’s The Mandalorian

Star Wars was famous for its movies, but TV shows have always remained a strong part of the franchise. This list of series has ranged from more unknown shows like Droid Tales (think of C-3P0 and R2-D2 running around the galaxy) to treasured classics like the Clone Wars. A new classic arrived in the form of The Mandalorian, which tells the story of a Mandalorian bounty hunter traveling the galaxy in search of targets to take down after the fall of the Galactic Empire. However, it quickly evolves into a deeper tale of the cultures of various societies like the Mandalorians, the state of the galaxy after the Empire fell, and lawless worlds far away from the civilized rule of the New Republic.

This is the way (source: https://www.amazon.com/Star-Wars-Mandalorian-Poster-Season/dp/B07ZTD59CG)

So far, there has only been one season, but season 2 is still going on while other seasons are in development. Season 1 introduces us to the life of Mandalorian bounty hunter Din Djarin and his adventures across the galaxy.

Can’t get more impressive than this (source: https://www.superherohype.com/tv/474262-the-mandalorian-season-1-review)

Throughout this season, there is a common theme of our protagonist entering a new challenge and coming out on top, especially after making a solid effort (even if sometimes, seemingly superhuman) to win. During this season, we get to see many different worlds that have seen the scars wrought by the Galactic Empire’s iron fist such as the continued Imperial presence on the volcanic world Nevarro and Imperial weaponry on the forest world of Sorgan. We learn about organizations like the Bounty Hunters’ Guild, an organization that serves as a monopoly for the cutthroat business.

Additionally, we learn about the cultures of different societies we encounter such as the Jawa scavenger species and the brutal Tusken Raiders who were notorious for being cold-blooded murderers. Most importantly, we learn about Din Djarin’s clan’s culture of anonymity after an event called the Great Purge, which killed most of the clan and forced others into hiding. Lastly, we get to meet lots of notable characters including one that won the hearts of millions of viewers – Baby Yoda!

Fun fact: He’s 50 years old, but that’s still very young for a species that can live past 900 years.

In Season One, there were eight episodes, and each episode seemed to smoothly transition to the other to create a well-defined plot line. All the fights, whether they featured Djarin facing off against thugs or advanced soldiers, were intense and kept everyone at the edge of their seats. The characters and plot twists that this series had stood out to anyone familiar with Star Wars lore due to heavy references to other famous Star Wars movies and TV series.

Lastly, the theme of family and sacrificing oneself for the next generation appears throughout the season. Djarin first bore witness to this through memories of his past where his parents hid him from invaders and even when an enigmatic Mandalorian armorer always saved pieces of armor for future generations of warriors. He later learned to personally exemplify these values during his journeys with “Baby Yoda” as he would bring him to his kind.

All in all, Season One of The Mandalorian perfectly set up the storyline for the show and gave a strong indication of how the show would go. It gave great insights into Mandalorian lore and values, cultures of lots of different species and organizations, and a galaxy still reeling from the Galactic Empire’s reign. Season One was a powerful start to a mind-blowing show that will continue to contribute to and support the Star Wars saga.

The show the Star Wars fandom always needed (source: https://star-wars-canon-extended.fandom.com/wiki/Din_Djarin)

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